X-MEN INVADE GHANA

In the near future of 2023, mutants are being hunted to extinction by the Sentinels. In Moscow, Warpath, Blink, Colossus, Sunspot and Iceman are killed by the Sentinels, whereas Bishop and Shadowcat transport back to an earlier time.

Professor X, Magneto, Wolverine and Storm arrive to find mutants hiding in Mongolia, where they plan to send Professor X back to 1973 to stop Mystique from killing Bolivar Trask, which triggered the Sentinel Program. However, Wolverine volunteers to go back due to his regenerative powers, and because Professor X couldn’t physically handle going back decades. As the X-Men hide themselves in a monastery, Wolverine is sent back to the past by Shadowcat after asked by Professor X and Magneto to unite them together.

Will he succeed? Will the future interfere with the past? Can the future be rewritten by a visit to the past?

This is what the entire world waits to find out this Friday the 23rd of May, 2014 at the worldwide premier of X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST.

The story gets even more exciting in Ghana as two of the leading characters in the Marvel franchise, Wolverine and Mystique will be at the Silverbird Cinema, at the capital, Accra. International Airbrush artist Ram Ankh has a hand in this and you definitely don’t want to miss this.

They, together with the VIPs, will be treated to a celebrity red carpet in pomp and pageantry  and patrons will have the opportunity to take pictures with them and might even get autographs. There will be a VIP cocktail after the premiere for the stars and VIPs in attendance and a chance to win a night’s stay at a hotel and dinner for two at Pappa’s Pizza!

What are you waiting for? Get your tickets today.  Call 0507242685/0544310140 or visit Silverbird Facebook page for a chance to win a free ticket. Limited offer. Rush.

Still don’t believe it? Click me

X-MEN: Day of Future Past

A Ghost With A Dilemma.

The university of Ghana’s Efua Sutherland Drama Studio was brimming  with drama lovers and as usual, yours truly fished for a seat in the front row and found none. Fortunately, there came Elorm Ajaho, Business Development Executive at Tiqeet, class mate and friend who did me the honors of providing a seat…thanks Elorm!

Ok back to business.

Ato Yawson is a Ghanaian who studied abroad and returns with an African American wife called Eulalie. This  play is evidence of the fact that literature is mostly a medium for cultural expression; the play is Ghanaian ( more specifically Akan ) and portrays aspects of Akan and Ghanaian culture namely and more specifically, the importance of child birth in marriage and the prevalence of the extended family system ‘still’ in the Ghanaian society.

Plays always represent or mirror society and have several aims aside entertainment. Plays educate and are tools of societal reform. In this play,  as interpreted by Benjamin Boare from the 1st to the 3rd of May, 2014, Ama Atta Aidoo through the characters she uses, presents certain topical issues that a reader or audience are left  pondering  over. For example, after sometime in marriage, Ato’s family starts wondering when Eulalie would give them a child. Technically, it is none of Ato’s family’s business if he and and his wife have a child or not but in the African and Ghanaian sense, this is indeed very much important and more or less the concern of every.single.member. of Ato’s family.

In most of Ama Atta Aidoo’s plays , she employs “village gossips”, the regular busy-bodies who  come in from time to time providing the audience very important information through their exchanges and dialogues and their commentary on the action. Through their gossip, we find out that Eulalie, Ato’s wife has a machine for each of her needs, as the women put it, Eulalie even has a box that cools her water!  (they speak of course of a refrigerator). One of these women is barren and gives a first hand narration of how much suffering and pain she has had to endure because she hasn’t been able to have a child. In a monologue, she warns Eulalie of her impending troubles if she is really barren and advises that Eulalie gets another one of her machines to cry for her when she dies. In order words, she will be rejected and unfit to be mourned when she dies.

The Ghanaian lusty desire to see children after marriage is manifested when Ato’s family after a long wait decide to take matters into their own hands and come to question Ato and Eulalie about their childless state. They come along with a herbal potion to wash Eulalie’s tummy. They believe this potion will give Eulalie the ability to bear children.

Unknown to Ato’s family is the fact that Ato and his wife use contraceptives that have given them the choice of when to have children. Of course, the traditional belief of  Ato’s family tells them that human beings have no power over when they choose to have children and that it is only God that gives children. This view conflicts with the view of the educated couple who believe having children is in their hands and by choice and can be controlled.

The conflict in the play is mainly as a result of such differences in beliefs and mindset. Ato fails in being the bridge between the two parties. Ato understands his people’s ways and at the same time understands Eulalie and her beliefs, therefore, he should have been the person that should have worked to promote understanding between these two cultures with their sharply contrasting worldviews and values.

The title of the play, The Dilemma Of A Ghost, reflects Ato’s confusion and dilemma because he is torn between his culture and his wife’s culture, his wife and people, his ideals and ideals of his people and the beliefs and ideals of his wife which conflicts with his wife’s. Ato is unable to control his situation and rather becomes trapped in what he could have changed.

His constant nightmares and hallucinations about two children playing the game about a ghost being unable to decide between going to Cape coast or Elmina is what reflects his troubled state and reflects the confused state he is in.

Here are a few photos from the play…

 

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Do you think child bearing should still be given as much weight in today’s civilization as it was then? Share your thoughts…

Discover other upcoming plays and events on TIQEET 0r download Android app for updates right on your phone. Now I can’t wait to hear your thoughts…

The Night The Clock Stopped Ticking

The auditorium was jam-packed. The air was light and the mood was utterly gay with laughter rippling across the tiers. With most people returning from the Easter festivities, Anticlockwise was a perfect play to wind down, have a hearty laugh, relax and reflect on where your life was going; clockwise or anticlockwise.

NIi Commey and Novelty Initiative took the National Theatre hostage on the 20th of April 2014 and for two straight hours (per show) subjecting the attendance to a night of uncontrollable laughter and some really deep food for thought. It felt like the clock had stopped ticking. The play, Anticlockwise written and directed byNii Commey (of Romantic Nonsense and Je m’appelle Romance fame), set in present day Accra, a city in Ghana, tells the story of a family struggling to make ends meet while still holding on to their highest aspirations. Oopana, head of the house, a college graduate and ex-banker turned poultry farmer appears to be working really hard but can’t seem add two and two to feed his family. His daughter, Naa Torshie is walking out of her third marriage in four years and blames all her marital misfortune on black men, or rather the black race. She swears to change her complexion in order to alter her fortunes. His son Tettey, however daydreams playing for Chelsea, and fancies himself being hailed as “Tettey Drobga”, after the famous Ivorian striker Didier Drogba. Tettey is also in love with  Abiba who is out of his league, literally. To add salt to injury, Abiba is also betrothed to Alhaji Babangida, a rich tycoon and old enough to be her father. Can they fight the odds and triumph? When success finally smiles on them with Tettey’s breakthrough into the Chelsea team and subsequent enlistment into the Back Stars, joy finally comes home and neighbours find reason to visit their house again.

Anticlockwise explores, among other themes, the basic issue of finding one’s essence in life and throwing all you have at it till it becomes a reality. In short, until you are fed up with your situation and choose to do the “ridiculous”  you can never get the “miraculous”. In Tettey’s case, he sold anything he could lay his hands on and invested the returns in securing his VISA.  The question is, “What are you willing to risk for what is most dear to your heart?” Blaming others like Naa Torshie will only make matters worse. Doing the ordinary things like Oopana will only maintain the status quo at best. But for a breakthrough, you need to do more. you need to believe, You need to persevere. You need to pay the painful price. That is the way to stop the anticlockwise motion of your life.

With a bountiful injection of subtle political satire, witty repartee, double entendre and plain street jokes the audience not only had a heart laugh but easily connected to the play and with the characters. The set was rather moderate, aptly depicting the social and economic status of the Oopnana family. In spite of few glitches from sound and miscues from the lighting crew, it was a perfect comedy for the family.  Applause was spontaneous and the cheers filled the room when the curtains finally came down. If you missed it, hope to catch it when it hits Kumasi later this year.

Have you ever felt like your life was going anticlockwise? What did you do to turn it round? Share. Did you see the play? What do you think? What jumped at you in the midst of all the laughter and the tears? Share a thought or ask the director a question.

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A bundle of hilarious twists and turns

Originally posted on Tiqeetflash:

It was a night packed with side splitting and rib cracking laughs from curtain rise till curtain fall when the Abibigromma Resident Theatre of the University of Ghana took the stage at the E.T.S Drama Studio. Rarely does one find a show open with a full house, an excited and discerning audience who appreciate a hearty laugh and a splendid performance. Such is ilfe.

Femi Osofisan’s Such is life comes alive once again at the Efua Theodora Sutherland Studio at the University of Ghana from the 28th to 30th March 2014 under the artistic directorship of Dr. Grace Uche Adninku. Set in the age of the Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) in Nigeria, similar to Ghana’s GIPC, Such is life highlights the impact of the harsh economic hardships survived by Nigerians even among the supposedly comfortable members of society. Prof. Juokwu, a lecturer of medicine and his ever suspicious wife Obioma…

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A bundle of hilarious twists and turns

It was a night packed with side splitting and rib cracking laughs from curtain rise till curtain fall when the Abibigromma Resident Theatre of the University of Ghana took the stage at the E.T.S Drama Studio. Rarely does one find a show open with a full house, an excited and discerning audience who appreciate a hearty laugh and a splendid performance. Such is ilfe.

Femi Osofisan’s Such is life comes alive once again at the Efua Theodora Sutherland Studio at the University of Ghana from the 28th to 30th March 2014 under the artistic directorship of Dr. Grace Uche Adninku. Set in the age of the Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) in Nigeria, similar to Ghana’s GIPC, Such is life highlights the impact of the harsh economic hardships survived by Nigerians even among the supposedly comfortable members of society. Prof. Juokwu, a lecturer of medicine and his ever suspicious wife Obioma, take us through the twist and turns of marital “bliss” and its undulating escapades. Prof. Juokwu being a scientist employs his learnings to induce what he aptly calls a “midnight blackout” on eagle-eyed wife evading her keen watch as he attends his “extracurricular” activities. Meanwhile an old suitor of Obioma returns from Rio with hot love burning in his chest to marry his true love.

Mr. Akubundu is somehow dragged into this convoluted twist of deceit, love, betrayal and manipulation. As a politician cum businessman, Mr. Akubundu is happy to sell not only his commodities but his political ideals as well. Well, with elections around the corner he has but little choice. Not until he discovers that his wife and Prof. Juokwu have put his political aspirations and reputation in a shaky place of imminent ridicule. As gentlemen, he and Prof. Juokwu agree to settle the issue with a duel.

Dr. Adinku is inspired by the complex issues underscoring this satirical comedy touching on infidelity, trust, and the domestic issues that plague regular people and how they seem to be at a loss given their misplaced priorities. To her the notion that it is normal for African men to be about town is simply unacceptable and we must engage society in active discourse if this predisposition is ever going to change. But even more important to her is the emphasis the play gives to priorities at home and balancing career ambitions and domestic challenges to stay on top of issues, as in the case of Mr. Akubundu, is far more important than public opinion.

The riveting performance of wits, repartees and pure humor in a myriads of ironies is interspersed with music and interesting dance interludes that neatly links the whole play together. The energy of the actors, eloquent delivery of lines and authenticity of acting is a sheer delight to watch.

The show continues till 30th March, 2014. You can find out more or buy discount tickets on Tiqeet.

 Abibigromma goes digital with SUCH IS LIFE

Abibigromma goes digital

Originally posted on Tiqeetflash:

Abibigromma , the resident theatre group of the School of Performing Arts, University of Ghana since its inception in 1983 finally goes digital offering electronic tickets in partnership with  Tiqeet .

Starting on the 27th of March 2014 in partnership with Tiqeet, Abibigromma is joining the elite league of productions houses that offer their most valuable clients and patrons extra convenience and comfort in purchasing ticket for their shows. With the recent wave of technology and its immense advantages it makes no sense for the model for repertory theatre that facilitates learning, research and experimentation not to adopt the latest innovation in the industry. Hence the partnership with Tiqeet.

Tiqeet is an event promotion and digital ticketing platform that enables event attendees to easily discover events and purchase tickets right from the convenience of their phones. It further provides intelligence on the attendees creating opportunities for quality feedback to…

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